GU’s Non-Compliance Checklist.

This is not a developed brief. It is just an initial checklist:

1. Failure to Amend Governing Documents. Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

A University established or approved by the Holy See, by an Episcopal Conference or another Assembly of Catholic Hierarchy, or by a diocesan Bishop is to incorporate [ECE’s] General Norms and their local and regional applications into its governing documents, and conform its existing Statutes both to the General Norms and to their applications, and submit them for approval to the competent ecclesiastical Authority. It is contemplated that other Catholic Universities, that is, those not established or approved in any of the above ways, with the agreement of the local ecclesiastical Authority, will make their own the General Norms and their local and regional applications, internalizing them into their governing documents, and, as far as possible, will conform their existing Statutes both to these General Norms and to their applications.” (Emphasis added.) Article 1, § 3.

Has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.  Of course, we knew the answer; we just wanted to be careful and fair.  In 1998, The Georgetown Academy quoted then-University president Fr. Leo O’Donovan S.J. to say “Ex corde will not affect Georgetown, if Georgetown does not let it.”  In 1999, TGA reported that at a university-wide special faculty meeting, Jesuit canon lawyer Fr. Ladislas Orsy, S.J told the assembled how “armed with a good lawyer who could interpret away the applicability of Ex corde to Georgetown” that Georgetown could avoid any alteration of its statutes and all other application of Ex corde.

2. Failure to Demonstrate an Institutional Commitment in All Activities: Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

A Catholic University, as Catholic, informs and carries out its research, teaching, and all other activities with Catholic ideals, principles and attitudes. It is linked with the Church either by a formal, constitutive and statutory bond or by reason of an institutional commitment made by those responsible for it.” (Emphasis added.) Article 2, § 2.

Has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.

3. Failure to Guarantee Its Catholic Identity In Its Structure and Regulations: Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

Every Catholic University is to make known its Catholic identity, either in a mission statement or in some other appropriate public document, unless authorized otherwise by the competent ecclesiastical Authority. The University, particularly through its structure and its regulations, is to provide means which will guarantee the expression and the preservation of this identity in a manner consistent with §2. (Emphasis added.) Article 2, § 3.

Has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.

4. Failure to Ensure that All Official Actions and Commitments Be Authentically Catholic. Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

Catholic teaching and discipline are to influence all university activities, while the freedom of conscience of each person is to be fully respected. Any official action or commitment of the University is to be in accord with its Catholic identity.” (Emphasis added.) Article 2, § 4.

Has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.

5. Failure to Protect the Rights of Individuals and the Community. Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

A Catholic University possesses the autonomy necessary to develop its distinctive identity and pursue its proper mission. Freedom in research and teaching is recognized and respected according to the principles and methods of each individual discipline, so long as the rights of the individual and of the community are preserved within the confines of the truth and the common good.(Emphasis added.) Article 2, § 5.

We know that Georgetown University has failed to guarantee the freedom of teachers to speak in defense of truth and the common good in the classroom.

6. Failure to Obtain Approvals of Required Documents. Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

A Catholic University may be established or approved by the Holy See, by an Episcopal Conference or other Assembly of Catholic Hierarchy, or by a diocesan Bishop…”

In the cases of §§ 1 and 2, the Statutes must be approved by the competent ecclesiastical Authority. (Emphasis added.) Article 3, § 4.

Has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.

7. Failure to Recruit Personnel Both Willing and Able To Promote Catholic Identity. Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

The responsibility for maintaining and strengthening the Catholic identity of the University rests primarily with the University itself. While this responsibility is entrusted principally to university authorities (including, when the positions exist, the Chancellor and/or a Board of Trustees or equivalent body), it is shared in varying degrees by all members of the university community, and therefore calls for the recruitment of adequate university personnel, especially teachers and administrators, who are both willing and able to promote that identity. The identity of a Catholic University is essentially linked to the quality of its teachers and to respect for Catholic doctrine. It is the responsibility of the competent Authority to watch over these two fundamental needs in accordance with what is indicated in Canon Law. (Emphasis added.) Article 4. § 1.

Has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.

8. Failure to Formally Inform all New Teachers and Administrators of Obligations. Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

All teachers and all administrators, at the time of their appointment, are to be informed about the Catholic identity of the Institution and its implications, and about their responsibility to promote, or at least to respect, that identity.” (Emphasis added.) Article 4. § 2

How has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.

9. Failure to Invite Respect of Catholic Doctrine and Morals. Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

“In ways appropriate to the different academic disciplines, all Catholic teachers are to be faithful to, and all other teachers are to respect, Catholic doctrine and morals in their research and teaching. In particular, Catholic theologians, aware that they fulfill a mandate received from the Church, are to be faithful to the Magisterium of the Church as the authentic interpreter of Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition.

(Emphasis added.) Article 4. § 3

Has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.

10. Failure to Implement the Required Affirmative Hiring Policy. Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

Those university teachers and administrators who belong to other Churches, ecclesial communities, or religions, as well as those who profess no religious belief, and also all students, are to recognize and respect the distinctive Catholic identity of the University. In order not to endanger the Catholic identity of the University or Institute of Higher Studies, the number of non-Catholic teachers should not be allowed to constitute a majority within the Institution, which is and must remain Catholic.” (Emphasis added.) Article 4, § 4.

Has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.

11. Failure to Provide Formation in Moral Principles and Catholic Social Teaching. Ex corde Ecclesiae requires that:

The education of students is to combine academic and professional development with formation in moral and religious principles and the social teachings of the Church; the programme of studies for each of the various professions is to include an appropriate ethical formation in that profession. Courses in Catholic doctrine are to be made available to all students.” (Emphasis added.) Article 4, § 5.

Has GU complied?

We gave the University the chance to confirm their compliance.  Their response confirmed that the answer is no.

And finally, do GU Catholic Theologians have the Mandatum (Mandate) from the Archbishop required by the 1993 Code of Canon Law?